The Michigan Engineer News Center

Prof Kerkez in new video on measuring lake conditions

A lake covered in green, thick algae is not only unpleasant to look at, it can also mean that natural toxins are negatively impacting other organisms in the lake.| Short Read

To better understand the health of lakes, Assistant Professor Branko Kerkez is developing an autonomous unmanned boat attached with temperature sensors to define hypoxic or dissolved oxygen areas in Michigan’s smaller lakes.

Kerkez and his students are testing a prototype of the boat in Ann Arbor’s Sister Lakes. The goal is to use this platform in the future to capture readings inside Lake Erie, an area with a history of hypoxic problems.

To learn more about this research, please visit YouTube or click on the box below.

The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities

Rather than installing new “2D” semiconductors in devices to see what they can do, this new method puts them through their paces with lasers and light detectors. | Medium Read