The Michigan Engineer News Center

Professor Lastoskie receives grant for joint project with Chinese university

Five teams from U-M and Shanghai Jiao Tong University in China are sharing $1 million in awards for research projects in the sixth round of funding of an ongoing collaboration between the two universities.| Short Read

The winning projects in the latest round of annual grants through the U-M/SJTU Collaborative Research Programs for Energy and Biomedical Technology were focused on nanotechnology and data science.

Associate Professor Christian Lastoskie and Professor Junliang Zhang of SJTU are the principal investigators for one of the winning projects. Their project is titled, “Mesoporous Carbon-Based Polyanionic Nanocomposite Cathodes for Lithium Ion Batteries.”

Their goal is to develop novel and superior electrode materials for lithium ion batteries.

The U-M/SJTU program convenes research teams with complementary perspectives and areas of expertise to tackle challenges in energy and health, among other fields, that transcend national borders.

The program funds projects that have commercial potential and are likely to attract follow-on research funding from the U.S. and Chinese governments, as well as industry.

To learn more, please visit the U-M record.

The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities

Rather than installing new “2D” semiconductors in devices to see what they can do, this new method puts them through their paces with lasers and light detectors. | Medium Read