The Michigan Engineer News Center

Chicago alumni connect at networking reception

The ACC is one of the world's premier scientific and engineering conferences dedicated to the advancement of control theory and practice.| Short Read

The first-ever alumni networking event in Chicago took place July 1, 2015, and approx. 35 local alumni met up with an additional 20 alumni, faculty and students who were in Chicago attending the 2015 American Control Conference (ACC). The ACC is one of the world’s premier scientific and engineering conferences dedicated to the advancement of control theory and practice. This year’s conference included STEM workshops for high school students, and ECE staff were on hand to talk with the students.

Attendees had a great time meeting up with other alumni in the area, as well as getting some insights into the department from Khalil Najafi, Schlumberger Professor and ECE Chair, and hearing about the world famous robotic research of Jessy Grizzle, Elmer G. Gilbert Distinguished University Professor and Jerry W. and Carol L. Levin Professor of Engineering.

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IMAGE:  Jessy Grizzle (L), Elmer G. Gilbert Distinguished University Professor and Jerry W. and Carol L. Levin Professor of Engineering, meets with alumni in the area.
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Khalil Najafi, Schlumberger Professor and ECE Chair, with happy winners of True Blue door prizes.

Posted: July 16, 2015

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Alumni at the event
Students networking
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Portrait of Catharine June

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Catharine June
ECE Communications and Marketing Manager

Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

(734) 936-2965

3301 EECS

The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities

Rather than installing new “2D” semiconductors in devices to see what they can do, this new method puts them through their paces with lasers and light detectors. | Medium Read