The Michigan Engineer News Center

Aero student, Devina Sanjaya, wins 1st Prize Paper

Devina Sanjaya, PhD candidate in Aerospace Engineering at the University of Michigan, was awarded 1st place for the paper and presentation “Improving High-Order Finite Element Approximation Through Geometrical Warping”.| Short Read

Devina Sanjaya, PhD candidate in Aerospace Engineering at the University of Michigan, was awarded 1st place for the paper and presentation “Improving High-Order Finite Element Approximation Through Geometrical Warping” entered in the 6th AIAA CFD Student Paper Competition at the 2015 AIAA Aviation Conference. There were 36 papers entered in the competition. The paper was co-authored by Prof. Krzysztof Fidkowski, Michigan Aerospace Associate Professor.

Before her doctorate study, Devina earned her Bachelor of Science in Aerospace Engineering with minor in Mathematics from the University of Michigan: Ann Arbor and her Master of Science in Aeronautics and Astronautics from Stanford University. Her research focuses on the development of algorithm to improve the robustness and accuracy of CFD methods, error estimation, and adaptive methods. Currently, she is working on combining geometrical warping with hp-adaptation to further improve high-order finite element approximation power.

Learn more about Devina at her website. https://sites.google.com/a/umich.edu/dsanjaya/

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The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities

Rather than installing new “2D” semiconductors in devices to see what they can do, this new method puts them through their paces with lasers and light detectors. | Medium Read