The Michigan Engineer News Center

Two new special topics classes offered in Aero

Aerospace Engineering will introduce two new special topics classes beginning in the fall of 2015.| Short Read

Aerospace professors, Anouck Girard and Ilya Kolmanovsky, will introduce two new special topics classes beginning in the fall of 2015, AE 495 Special Topics in Aerospace Engineering: Aerospace Vehicle Control and AE 740 Special Topics in Flight Dynamics and Control: Nonlinear and Predictive Control.

For more information contact the Aerospace Engineering office at 764-3310.

AE 495 Special Topics in Aerospace Engineering: Aerospace Vehicle Control

Instructor: A Girard • Meets: TuTh 10:30 am – 12:00 pm
Course Objectives: Apply feedback control techniques to aerospace vehicles. Kinematics and dynamics of aircraft and spacecraft for feedback control. Relationship between state space and transfer functions models including controllability and observability. Lyapunov and Nyquist stability analysis in the time and frequency domains. The Kalman filter and its use in the linear quadratic regulator. Effect of nonminimum-phase zeros, delays, and nonlinearities on vehicle performance and reliability.

Prerequisites: AE347 and/or AE348

AE 470 Special Topics in Flight Dynamics and Control: Nonlinear and Predictive Control

Instructors: A. Girard and I. Kolmanovsky • Meets: MW 10:30 am – 12:00 pm
Description: Fundamental properties of nonlinear systems; nonlinear stability; nonlinear controllability and observability; feedback stabilization and linearization; sliding control theory; nonlinear model predictive control.

Portrait of Kim Johnson

Contact

Kimberly Johnson
Communications Manager

Aerospace Engineering

(734) 647-4701

3054 FXB

The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities

Rather than installing new “2D” semiconductors in devices to see what they can do, this new method puts them through their paces with lasers and light detectors. | Medium Read