The Michigan Engineer News Center

Professor John C. Lee wins ANS Arthur Holly Compton Award

Professor John C. Lee has been selected as the 2015 recipient of the prestigious Arthur Holly Compton Award.| Short Read

Professor John C. Lee has been selected as the 2015 recipient of the prestigious Arthur Holly Compton Award. The award is bestowed by the American Nuclear Society for outstanding contributions to education in the field of nuclear science and/or engineering. Lee received the award at the ANS Annual Meeting in San Antonio in June.

Throughout his work in industry and his 40-year academic career at U-M, the guiding vision for Lee’s work has been to help make nuclear energy a safe and clean form of energy for humanity.

Lee has made advances within the broad areas of both nuclear reactor physics and engineering. Early on, he developed the TRANSG code for nuclear steam generator simulations. More recently he has been working on time-dependent neutron transport algorithms as part of the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors, on advanced probabilistic safety analysis for nuclear power plants, and on the optimization of nuclear fuel cycles. The textbook he co-authored, Risk and Safety Analysis of Nuclear Systems, was published in 2011 (Wiley) and translated into Japanese in 2013.

Lee is a Fellow of the American Nuclear Society. Among other contributions, he has served as vice chair and chair of the Nuclear Installations Safety Division, dedicated to enhancing the safety and reliability of nuclear power plants.

Several other NERS faculty members have received the Arthur Holly Compton Award over the years, including President Emeritus and University Professor of Science and Engineering James Duderstadt, the late Professor Emeritus William Kerr and the late Professor Emeritus Glenn Knoll.

Portrait of Steven Winters

Contact

Steven Winters
Human Resources Generalist

Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences

(734) 764-4261

1902 Cooley

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