The Michigan Engineer News Center

Pile driver sensors

Pile driving produces thousands of impacts every day, a team at Michigan is hoping a new sensor can predict soil settlement before an accident occurs.| Short Read

Pile driving produces thousands of impacts every day. Vibrations from pile driving create cracks in deep foundations for nearby structures like bridges. A team at Michigan is hoping a new sensor can predict soil settlement before an accident occurs.

Ground surface sensors have traditionally been used to measure the vibrations, but the length needed to travel from deep underground in order to reach the sensors is telling only part of the story.

Adda Athanasopoulos-Zekkos, Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering is taking a different approach by installing both geophones and accelerometers in depth and very close to the driven pile. This has given her team data that is first of its kind and will hopefully lead to a better understanding of how much soil settlement is produced in a construction site.

Adda Athanasopoulo-Zekkos is an Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering. She grew up in Patras, Greece, and, as an undergraduate, she studied civil engineering at the University of Patras. Adda helps spearhead the Network for Excellence in Women in Civil Engineering (NeW in CE), an initiative for women to receive mentoring, networking and research opportunities and excel in civil engineering.

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