The Michigan Engineer News Center

Professor Clack in new video

Associate Professor Herek Clack is featured in a new video from MConneX titled, “Mercury in the Air.”| Short Read

Coal-fired power plants utilize a highly charged electric field, with the help of an electrostatic precipitator (ESP), to trap ash and other particulates. This keeps the amount of ash escaping from the plant very low. However, mercury can also be found in coal, and the ESP’s are less adept at capturing it.

In order to solve this problem, Clack has developed a method that works in tandem with an ESP, reducing the amount of mercury emitted into the air while at the same time not adding a separate process to an already complex power plant system.

Clack’s research focuses on the study, characterization, and enhancement of fluid, thermal, and mass transport processes, primarily associated with combustion and combustion emissions control.
To watch the video, please visit YouTube or click the box below.

The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities

Rather than installing new “2D” semiconductors in devices to see what they can do, this new method puts them through their paces with lasers and light detectors. | Medium Read