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Liquid bonding a super plastic

A new 'super plastic' that can direct heat away from its source opens up a wide range of possibilities for making more efficient electronic devices.| Short Read

About this video

A new ‘super plastic’ that can direct heat away from its source opens up a wide range of possibilities for making more efficient electronic devices.

The teams from Associate Professors Jinsang Kim and Kevin Pipe are using hydrogen bonding from two different liquid polymers to regenerate a continuous pathway for heat transfer. These same principles can be used to “fine tune” other thermal properties to design future heat resisting or insulating plastics.

About the Professors

Kevin Pipe is an Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Michigan College of Engineering. He researches Microscale heat transfer, especially related to electronic and optoelectronic devices. He is also Associate Chair for Graduate Education; Associate Professor, Applied Physics Program and Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.

Jinsang Kim is an Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Michigan College of Engineering. He researches molecular design, synthesis, modification and self-assembly of smart polymers for biomedical and optoelectronic applications. He also holds Associate Professor titles in Chemical Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, Macromolecular Science and Engineering and Chemistry.

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Contact

Sandra Hines
Alumni Engagement Project Manager

Michigan Engineering
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(734) 647-5381

3214 SI-North

Researchers
  • Jinsang Kim

    Jinsang Kim

    Professor of Materials Science and Engineering

  • Kevin Pipe

    Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Reading cancer’s chemical clues

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