The Michigan Engineer News Center

25/50/75 celebration in honor of Scott Fogler

The Department of Chemical Engineering invites you the 25/50/75 Celebration for Professor H. Scott Fogler, to be held on May 16, 2015.| Short Read

The Department of Chemical Engineering invites you the 25/50/75 Celebration for Professor H. Scott Fogler, to be held on May 16, 2015. We will celebrate 25 years of Scott’s book as the dominant textbook in chemical reaction engineering, his 50 years at the University of Michigan, and his 75th birthday. The celebration will consist of an afternoon symposium between 2:00-4:30 p.m., with brief talks by Scott’s most recent PhD students, followed by remarks by selected guests who will talk about a research topic or a work experience. The presenters will also discuss some of Scott’s contributions to the department, AIChE, CACHE, the Thailand Program, the South Africa initiative, and his textbooks. The symposium will be followed by an evening/dinner banquet where it is expected his graduate students will recall stories about Scott and their time in Ann Arbor.

If you are able to attend and want to reserve a place at the banquet, please email Laura Bracken atlauradb@umich.edu by May 1, 2015. If you cannot attend, but would like to send a remembrance, Laura Bracken will be collecting any notes you send.

Portrait of Sandy Swisher

Contact

Sandy Swisher
Communications & Alumni Relations Coordinator

Chemical Engineering

(734) 764-7413

3118 Dow

The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities

Rather than installing new “2D” semiconductors in devices to see what they can do, this new method puts them through their paces with lasers and light detectors. | Medium Read