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Storm chaser satellite

CYGNSS will be capable of providing new images of ongoing hurricanes every 12 minutes, as opposed to the once-per-day measurement current satellites provide. U-M researchers are working on the mission under a contract with NASA.| Short Read
CYGNSS will be capable of providing new images of ongoing hurricanes every 12 minutes, as opposed to the once-per-day measurement current satellites provide

About this video

In chambers that mimic the vacuum of space, Michigan Engineers are testing a prototype of NASA’s CYGNSS satellite system, which will enable unprecedented insights into the formation and evolution of hurricanes, typhoons and cyclones around the globe. By using a constellation configuration of eight satellites, CYGNSS will be capable of providing new images of ongoing hurricanes every 12 minutes, as opposed to the once-per-day measurement current satellites provide. University of Michigan researchers are working on the mission under a contract with NASA. Because of the size and streamlined design of the satellites, this first-of-its-kind mission is moving forward at more than twice the speed of a typical mission. It’s expected to launch in 2016.

In addition to leading the mission’s science objectives, Michigan Engineering researchers are involved in designing, building and testing the CYGNSS satellites.

About the Professor

Chris Ruf is Director of the Space Physics Research Laboratory and is a Professor of Climate and Space Sciences in the Department of Climate and Space Sciences and Engineering in the University of Michigan College of Engineering. His research focuses on Global Navigation Satellite System Mission Execution.

Portrait of EJ Olsen

Contact

EJ Olsen
Marketing Communications Specialist

Climate and Space Sciences and Engineering

(734) 548-3204

2239 SRB

Researchers
  • Chris Ruf

    Chris Ruf

    Professor of Climate and Space Sciences and Engineering

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