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How big data could reduce flight delays

Data from the project may be used to build computer modeling software that could predict the outcome of an infinite number of hypothetical flight and weather scenarios, helping airlines spot likely weather delays in advance.| Short Read
Data from the project may be used to build computer modeling software that could predict the outcome of an infinite number of hypothetical flight and weather scenarios, helping airlines spot likely weather delays in advance.

About this video

Travelers may see fewer delays thanks to research now being conducted by a team of University of Michigan engineers. They’ve gathered more than ten years of hour-by-hour weather observations and domestic fight data and are using advanced data analytics to spot patterns and help airlines manage more efficiently.

Data from the project may be used to build computer modeling software that could predict the outcome of an infinite number of hypothetical flight and weather scenarios, helping airlines spot likely weather delays in advance.

That knowledge could enable airlines to adjust their schedules to account for weather patterns. It may also lead to better communication with travelers and a less stressful flight experience.

About the Professor

Amy Cohn joined the Industrial and Operations Engineering department in 2002 as an Assistant Professor and was promoted to Associate Professor in 2009. In 2011, she was also named a Thurnau Professor. She currently holds the position of Associate Director for the Center for Healthcare Engineering and Patient Safety. Her primary research interest is in robust and integrated planning for large-scale systems, predominantly in healthcare and aviation applications. She also collaborates on projects in satellite communications, vehicle routing problems for hybrid fleets, and robust network design for power systems and related applications. Her primary teaching interest is in optimization techniques, at both the graduate and undergraduate level.

Portrait of Elizabeth Fisher

Contact

Elizabeth Fisher
Marketing Communications Specialist

Industrial & Operations Engineering

(734) 764-5657

1883 IOE

Researchers
  • Amy Cohn

    Amy Cohn

    Associate Professor of Industrial and Operations Engineering

Electricity, eel-style: Soft power cells could run tomorrow’s implantables

Device generates over 100 volts from saltwater | Short Read