The Michigan Engineer News Center

Prof. Robert Dick to apply cyber information to air quality management

The grant is part of a new $12.5M initiative by the National Science Foundation to encourage computing innovations for a sustainable society. | Short Read
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Prof. Robert Dick, Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and specialist in embedded systems, received a CyberSEES grant to study the impact of weather and human activity on production of, and exposure to, ozone and other air pollutants.

The grant, “Connecting Next-generation Air Pollution Exposure Measurements to Environmentally Sustainable Communities,” is part of a new $12.5M initiative by the National Science Foundation to encourage computing innovations for a sustainable society [see the NSF press release]. The initiative is called CyberSEES, short for Cyber-Innovation for Sustainability Science and Engineering. The CyberSEES program aims to advance the science of sustainability in tandem with advances in computing and communication technologies.

Robert’s work on the project will focus on gathering information about air quality in the micro-environments around people, and will be used in the development of scalable pollution exposure models.  These models will help us better understand the relationships between human activity, weather, and the  production of, and exposure to, ozone and other air pollutants. [read more about the project]

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The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities

Rather than installing new “2D” semiconductors in devices to see what they can do, this new method puts them through their paces with lasers and light detectors. | Medium Read