The Michigan Engineer News Center

Knoll family leaves nuclear measurement legacy at U-M

Last April, the University of Michigan lost beloved professor, researcher, mentor and friend when Dr. Glenn Knoll passed away. | Short Read

Last April, the University of Michigan lost beloved professor, researcher, mentor and friend when Dr. Glenn Knoll passed away. In his memory, the Knoll family has endowed the Glenn F. Knoll Lecture in Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences. This annual lecture will commemorate Professor Knoll by inviting a prominent scientist in Nuclear Measurements to present to University of Michigan students.

“Glenn’s first love was his students and their research. He always enjoyed the contact he had with graduate students. This lecture series is a way that Glenn’s legacy can encourage engagement between University of Michigan students and researchers in radiation measurement,” says Gladys Knoll.

A committee of NERS faculty, Zhong He (Chair), Dave Wehe, and alumnus John Engdahl will select the lecturer each year. The first lecture will take place in the fall term of 2015.

“Professor Glenn Knoll pioneered the field of radiation detection and measurement that brought NERS department to the forefront of research and teaching and helped NERS earn its #1 ranking in their graduate program. The field of nuclear measurements has assumed crucial importance with today’s concerns about nuclear proliferation and terrorism. It is entirely fitting that the Glenn F. Knoll Lecture will bring top scholars to the University of Michigan to educate new generations of students in the field of Nuclear Measurements,” says Ronald Gilgenbach, Chair and Chihiro Kikuchi Collegiate Professor, Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences Department, University of Michigan.

For more information about the Glenn F. Knoll Lecture series please contact the Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences Department at (734) 764-4260 or email hezhong@umich.edu.

Portrait of Steven Winters

Contact

Steven Winters
Human Resources Generalist

Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences

(734) 764-4261

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