The Michigan Engineer News Center

Glotzer receives DOE INCITE grant

The Department of Energy's INCITE program has awarded Sharon C. Glotzer a 2015 grant for 55 million core-hours on US supercomputers.| Short Read

The Department of Energy’s INCITE program has awarded Sharon C. Glotzer a 2015 grant for 55 million core-hours on US supercomputers to discover mechanisms by which complex crystals assemble for a large library of particle shapes, yielding insights for design and development of new nanomaterials.  DOE selected projects that will advance knowledge in critical areas from sustainable energy technologies to climate modeling.

Read more about the program and the other 2015 projects at the link below.

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The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities

Rather than installing new “2D” semiconductors in devices to see what they can do, this new method puts them through their paces with lasers and light detectors. | Medium Read