The Michigan Engineer News Center

Alumnus Adam Larky receives Engineering Society of Detroit’s Outstanding Leadership Award

Adam Larky (BSE ’92, MSE ’94), PE, Central Region Vice President of the Cornerstone Environmental Group, LLC, recently received the Engineering Society of Detroit’s (ESD) Outstanding Leadership Award.| Short Read
EnlargeAdam Larky
IMAGE:   Adam Larky

Adam Larky (BSE ’92, MSE ’94), PE, Central Region Vice President of the Cornerstone Environmental Group, LLC, recently received the Engineering Society of Detroit’s (ESD) Outstanding Leadership Award.

Larky was honored for his work on the joint ESD/Michigan Waste Industries Association annual Solid Waste Conference planning committee. As an active committee member since 2002, and currently the group’s chair, Larky leads a group of Michigan’s leading solid waste industry experts to plan and conduct the annual technical conference.

Larky has been with Cornerstone since it was founded in 2006 and was promoted to Central Region Vice President in 2013. Based in Farmington Hills, Michigan, Larky is a registered professional engineer in Alabama, Illinois, Kansas, Maryland, Michigan, Missouri and Nebraska. He has more than 20 years of experience in solid waste management, landfill engineering, civil engineering, environmental engineering, and groundwater monitoring and investigation.

“Cornerstone places great value in being active in professional societies, industry associations, and community groups and deeply recognizes the value these bring to our professional staff and the industry as a whole,” said Matthew Davies, Co-President of Cornerstone. “I am delighted that Adam has received this prestigious award and proud of the role he is playing in the regional solid waste community.”

Adam Larky
Jessica Petras

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