The Michigan Engineer News Center

CEE now offers a Minor in Environmental Engineering

The new minor in Environmental Engineering provides students with a basic background in the tools environmental engineers use to assess environmental impacts.| Short Read

Administered through the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, the minor in Environmental Engineering provides students with a basic background in the tools environmental engineers use to assess environmental impacts, model contaminant fate, and perform sustainable engineering decision-making. CoE students may declare the minor provided they meet the following eligibility requirements:

•    Students must have a grade point average of 2.0 or higher at the time of declaration.
•    Students must have completed the prerequisite coursework for the “core” minor courses with a C or better.
•    Students pursuing a major in Civil and Environmental Engineering are not eligible for the minor.

A minimum of 16 credit hours, three core courses and two electives, is required to complete the Environmental Engineering minor. All courses for the minor must be completed with a grade of C or better as follows:

Required core courses (10-11 credits):

•    CEE 265 Sustainable Engineering Principles
•    CEE 325 Fluid Mechanics (or equivalent from: MECHENG 320, CHE 341, NERS 344, NAVARCH 320, AEROSP 225, BIMEDE 331, MATSCIE 335)
•    CEE 365 Environmental Engineering Principles

Two electives, (6 credits), from the following courses:

•    CEE 428 Groundwater Hydrology
•    CEE 460 Design of Environmental Engineering Systems
•    CEE 465 Environmental Process Engineering
•    CEE 481 Aquatic Chemistry
•    CEE 482 Environmental Microbiology
•    CEE 563 Air Quality Engineering Fundamentals

To declare, please visit the advising calendar.

The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities

Rather than installing new “2D” semiconductors in devices to see what they can do, this new method puts them through their paces with lasers and light detectors. | Medium Read