The Michigan Engineer News Center

Powering the internet of things

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Imagine a gym shirt that tells an app your body temp and heart rate, or could alert you before an asthma attack happens. What if your plant fertilizer reminded your cell phone when it was time to water? The Internet of things will soon make things like this a reality.

But how to power those trillions of devices? In the next ten years, the Internet of things could result in the disposal of about 300 million batteries a day across the globe. Michigan Engineers are working to solve this problem, creating ultra low-power wireless integrated circuits & systems that are able to make quick decisions locally that save energy in processing power.

Michigan Engineers are developing ultra low power circuits and systems to make the Internet of the future possible.

About the Professor

David Wentzloff is an Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Scienceat the University of Michigan College of Engineering. His research focuses broadly on low-power integrated circuits (ICs) for wireless communication in energy-constrained and volume-constrained applications. His Wireless Integrated Circuits & Systems Group focuses on synthesizable all-digital radios and radio building blocks, wireless body sensor networks, and radios and interfaces for the mm-scale class of computers.

Portrait of Catharine June

Contact

Catharine June
ECE Communications and Marketing Manager

Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

(734) 936-2965

3301 EECS

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