The Michigan Engineer News Center

Lola Eniola-Adefeso promoted to associate professor

Based on high performance in research, teaching and service, Lola Eniola-Adefeso has been promoted to associate professor in the department of chemical engineering.| Short Read

Based on high performance in research, teaching and service, Lola Eniola-Adefeso has been promoted to associate professor in the department of chemical engineering.

Her research has exposed new challenges in the hot field of drug delivery using micro and nano particles. By exploring how these particles behave in experimentally simulated blood vessels, her group hopes to discover how cells and molecules in the bloodstream affect how well the particles deliver drugs. This knowledge can then be applied to the design of new and highly intelligent drug delivery system for treating life-threatening diseases such as the hardening of the arteries.  Here group is focused on cardiovascular diseases, which remain the number one cause of mortality in the US.

Eniola-Adefeso forged new ground in the teaching curriculum by incorporating an outreach program into the projects of two core chemical engineering courses. These programs give the chemical engineering students early experience in process design and presentation while also exposing local middle and high school students to chemical engineering. For this innovation, she was selected to present at the National Academy of Engineers Frontiers of Engineering Education conference in 2012, and she was the recipient of the 2012 U-M’s Provost Teaching Innovation Award for this effort.

Other recent honors and awards include the Miller Faculty Scholar title at U-M (2013), the National Science Foundation CAREER award (2011) and the American Heart Association’s Innovator award (2010). Dr. Eniola-Adefeso is currently a visiting associate professor in the newly founded Institute of Molecular Engineering at the University of Chicago.

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Sandy Swisher
Communications & Alumni Relations Coordinator

Chemical Engineering

(734) 764-7413

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The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities

Rather than installing new “2D” semiconductors in devices to see what they can do, this new method puts them through their paces with lasers and light detectors. | Medium Read