The Michigan Engineer News Center

Four CAREER awards within past year

Assistant Professors Adda Athanasopoulos-Zekkos, Ann Jeffers, Carol Menassa and Krista Wigginton have each earned National Science Foundation (NSF) Career Awards within the past twelve months.| Short Read

This award is given to those who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research. It is NSF’s most prestigious award in support of junior faculty.

Athanasopoulos-Zekkos’ project is titled, “Promoting a Fundamental Understanding of Post-Liquefaction Response and Deformations: A Next-Generation Analytical and Experimental Methodology.”

Jeffers project is titled “Traveling Fires – Do they Really Matter.”

Menassa’s project is titled, “Multi-Level Occupancy Intervention, Simulation and Education for Energy Reduction in Existing Buildings.”

Wigginton’s project is titled, “Wastewater Treatment as a Conduit and Control of Emerging Respiratory Viruses in the Environment.”

The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities

Rather than installing new “2D” semiconductors in devices to see what they can do, this new method puts them through their paces with lasers and light detectors. | Medium Read