The Michigan Engineer News Center

Alumnus Tetsushi Kanda honored at graduate symposium

Alumnus Dr. Tetsushi Kanda (PhD ’98) was presented with the Arbor Networks PhD Research Impact Award at the 8th Annual Engineering Graduate Symposium on Friday, November 15.| Short Read
EnlargeTetsushi Kanda
IMAGE:  Tetsushi Kanda

This award is designed to bring alums with remarkable entrepreneurial impact back to campus to meet PhD students and tell them about their experiences and lessons learned. The award is given to those who have made a significant discovery or innovation in their PhD dissertation research that was deployed by themselves or others to create impact by starting a company or by translating the research into existing companies and organizations.

Dr. Kanda’s design of super-ductile fiber reinforced cementitious composites (ECC) has led to innovative construction projects such as the first high-rise building with ECC coupling beams in high-risk earthquake zones of Tokyo and Osaka, Japan.

Professor Victor Li was Kanda’s adviser. Today, Kanda is a general manager of the building construction and materials research group at Kajima Technical Research Institute. KaTRI belongs to Kajima Corporation, which is one of the largest constructors in Japan and the top 20 construction enterprises in the world.

In addition to ECC, Kanda has accomplished many application examples utilizing fundamental advanced research results in building construction industry, such as zero-shrinkage concrete and low carbon concrete. These achievements were broadly recognized by numerous awards by academic or professional societies in Japan.

During Kanda’s visit, he also gave a lecture to the CEE community titled, “Recent Developing Technologies: Practical Low Carbon Concrete.”

Tetsushi Kanda
Jessica Petras

Contact

Jessica Petras
Marketing Communications Specialist

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

(734) 764-9876

GG Brown 2105E

Cells under a microscope

Speedy “slingshot” cell movement observed for the first time

New findings suggest it might one day be possible to direct healthy cells to advance tissue repair therapies. | Short Read