The Michigan Engineer News Center

Bharan Giridhar awarded Intel PhD Fellowship

Bharan's research focusses on developing circuit techniques for adaptive and reliable high-performance computing.| Short Read
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Bharan Giridhar, a Ph.D. candidate in Electrical Engineering, has been selected to receive a prestigious Intel Corporation Ph.D. Fellowship for the 2013-14 academic year.

Bharan’s research area is Very Large Scale Integrated (VLSI) chip design, with an emphasis on developing circuit techniques for adaptive and reliable, high-performance computing. He has co-authored 8 conference and journal articles while at Michigan, and has been involved in the Centip3De project, which is a 64-core, 3D stacked near-threadhold system. His specific research is described here. Bharan Giridhar is advised by Prof. David Blaauw.

The Intel Ph.D. fellowship is awarded to outstanding Ph.D. candidates at select universities in the United States, and includes the opportunity for recipients to be mentored by Intel engineers.

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The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities

Rather than installing new “2D” semiconductors in devices to see what they can do, this new method puts them through their paces with lasers and light detectors. | Medium Read