The Michigan Engineer News Center

The growing problem of “space junk”

U-M Professor Jamie Cutler describes the challenges with controlling and anticipating collisions with space debris, and how that challenge is being tackled in space exploration.| Short Read

About this Video

U-M Professor Jamie Cutler describes the challenges with controlling and anticipating collisions with space debris, and how that challenge is being tackled in space exploration. The discussion comes as NASA cancels a potential maneuver to move the Space Station after worries that it could collide with space debris.

EnlargePortrait of James Cutler.
IMAGE:  Portrait of James Cutler. Photo: Joseph Xu, Michigan Engineering

About the Professor

James Cutler an assistant professor in the Aerospace Engineering Department at the University of Michigan. His research interests center on space systems — a multidisciplinary approach to enabling future space capability with particular emphasis on novel, nanosatellite missions. He is developing next generation communication capability and robust space computing infrastructure. He is the director of the Michigan Exploration Laboratory.

Portrait of James Cutler.
Portrait of Kim Johnson

Contact

Kimberly Johnson
Communications Manager

Aerospace Engineering

(734) 647-4701

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Researchers
The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities

Rather than installing new “2D” semiconductors in devices to see what they can do, this new method puts them through their paces with lasers and light detectors. | Medium Read