The Michigan Engineer News Center

Nonlinear Optics at 50: A Symposium

As the birthplace of nonlinear optics, the University of Michigan is proud to host a symposium which will bring together some of the pioneers in the field.| Short Read
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In 1961, Professor Peter Franken and his coworkers in the Randall Laboratory at the University of Michigan observed for the first time the generation of optical harmonics. This event launched a golden age in optical physics that has led to applications in fields ranging from optical communications and biological imaging to X-ray generation and homeland security.

As the birthplace of nonlinear optics, the University of Michigan is proud to host a one-day symposium on October 26th which will bring together some of the pioneers in the field and showcase the current state of the art in nonlinear optics.

Among the confirmed speakers are the physics Nobel Prize winners Ted Haensch and Nicolaas Bloembergen, honored for their work in nonlinear optics. Please register promptly at the symposium website to ensure seating.

Symposium attendance is free for all.

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Catharine June
ECE Communications and Marketing Manager

Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

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