The Michigan Engineer News Center

Tanya Das earns Poetry Prize

Tanya said she believes engineers have a unique perspective on the world because of their training, making it natural to draw analogies between humans and science.| Short Read
EnlargeTanya Das
IMAGE:  

Tanya Das decided to try her hand at poetry when she saw the announcement about the 2011 Roger M. Jones Poetry Contest. She was “completely surprised” to find out she was selected as third place winner in the contest. Tanya said she believes engineers have a unique perspective on the world because of their training, making it natural to draw analogies between human beings and scientific principles.

Tanya will be graduating this year with her undergraduate degree in electrical engineering, and plans to continue her graduate studies in electrical engineering at UC Santa Barbara in the Fall. She stated, “I have immensely enjoyed my time at the University of Michigan, especially meeting graduate students in EE and doing research with Dr. Jamie Phillips’ research group in the Solid State Electronics Lab.”

Enjoy her poetry, posted here.

About the contest

The Roger M. Jones Poetry Contest was established by Professor Jones’ colleagues in 1977 to honor his memory and his commitment to teaching engineering students about poetry. The contest encourages engineering students to write poetry and to experience thereby the pleasure of using their creative imaginations to speak to others.

Tanya Das
Portrait of Catharine June

Contact

Catharine June
ECE Communications and Marketing Manager

Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

(734) 936-2965

3301 EECS

The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities

Rather than installing new “2D” semiconductors in devices to see what they can do, this new method puts them through their paces with lasers and light detectors. | Medium Read