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U-M researchers win 2010 Signal Processing Best Paper Award

The work, published in 2006, will be acknowledged at the EUSIPCO Conference in Denmark.| Short Read
EnlargeGilbert, Strauss, and Tropp
IMAGE:  Gilbert, Strauss, and Tropp

U-M researchers Anna GilbertMartin Strauss, and Joel Tropp have won the 2010 Signal Processing Best Paper Award from the European Association for Signal Processing (EURASIP). This award is given to a paper published in the previous four years in the EURASIP Journal of Signal Processing.

The paper, entitled “Algorithms for simultaneous sparse approximation. Part I: Greedy pursuit,” was published in Signal Processing, Volume 86, Issue 3, March 2006. The work was done when all three researchers were at U-M. (Tropp was then an assistant professor in Mathematics at U-M; he is now an assistant professor at California Institute of Technology).

The award will be given at the Conference Banquet of the 18th EUSIPCO Conference, which will be held on August 23-27 2010, in Aalborg, Denmark.

Anna Gilbert is an Associate Professor of Mathematics and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. Her research interests include analysis, probability, networking, and algorithms. She is especially interested in randomized algorithms with applications to harmonic analysis, signal and image processing, networking, and massive data sets.

Martin Strauss is an Associate Professor of Mathematics and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. HIs research interests include fundamental algorithms, especially randomized and approximation algorithms; algorithms for massive data sets; signal processing and and computational harmonic analysis; computer security and cryptography; and complexity theory.

Gilbert, Strauss, and Tropp
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Hurricane Florence approaching the east coast. Photo courtesy of the NOAA

Hurricane Florence: U-M researchers forecast impacts

More than 2 million people could lose power, and flooding is the major concern for several reasons. | Medium Read