The Michigan Engineer News Center

Matthew Fojtik awarded Intel Foundation/SRCEA Fellowship

The fellowship will support Fojtik's work on a processor that can recover from timing errors and run without margining for worst case operating conditions.| Short Read
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Matthew Fojtik, graduate student in electrical engineering, was recently awarded a highly competitive Intel Foundation/Semiconductor Research Corporation Education Alliance (SRCEA) Fellowship. Only 10 such fellowships were awarded in the nation. This is a five-year fellowship to support Fojtik’s research with Prof. Dennis Sylvester.

Matt received his B.S.E. from the University of Michigan in electrical engineering in 2008, and is currently conducting research on novel design strategies for robust ultra-low power integrated circuits. Specifically, he is working on an asynchronous processor that can recover from timing errors and run without margining for worst case operating conditions.

We wish Matt congratulations on his upcoming marriage to Jennifer!

Additional Information about the Fellowship Program

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Catharine June
ECE Communications and Marketing Manager

Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

(734) 936-2965

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The electrons absorb laser light and set up “momentum combs” (the hills) spanning the energy valleys within the material (the red line). When the electrons have an energy allowed by the quantum mechanical structure of the material—and also touch the edge of the valley—they emit light. This is why some teeth of the combs are bright and some are dark. By measuring the emitted light and precisely locating its source, the research mapped out the energy valleys in a 2D crystal of tungsten diselenide. Credit: Markus Borsch, Quantum Science Theory Lab, University of Michigan.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities

Rather than installing new “2D” semiconductors in devices to see what they can do, this new method puts them through their paces with lasers and light detectors. | Medium Read